Press

AllMusic  (4 stars) (Paul Simpson, March 28, 2019) [for Turning Jewels Into Water]

“The duo keep their ear to global dance music innovations, dedicating one track to Lisbon-based visionary  Nidia and handing others over to producers such as Kenya’s Slikback and Mexico City’s Nueve Vidas. While informed by styles like footwork and kuduro, TJIW never try to directly emulate them, instead forging their own cross-cultural path which envisions a more positive, unified world.” Read More…

Bandcamp (Album of the Day) (Shanice Brim, March 27, 2019) [for Turning Jewels Into Water]


“The album’s 11 songs are heavily percussive, built from live instrumentation as well as electronic sounds and turntables. “Talang” works an idiosyncratic groove, with clipped vocal samples, video-gamey synths, and echoing drum patterns that alternate between layered, frenetic, and measured. The driving “Cave Rain Drumming in My Ear” builds its hyperactive rhythm from digital drums and pinprick vocal samples. And on the title track, the duo seems to be creating a drum circle for the digital age, opening with a ricocheting rhythm and gradually layering in synths and digital effects.” Read More…

National Sawdust Blog (Album of the Week!) (Steve Smith, March 15, 2019) [for Turning Jewels Into Water]
“All those points of similarity resonate throughout Map of Absences, a lean, taut collection of wiry beats, spacious echoes, and snatches of voices tugged out of their original contexts and set adrift in foreign terrains. It’s as important to remember, though, that for all their affinities, Jeanty and Momin also are very different and distinct artists, and that’s every bit as much a part of their successful collaboration. I won’t pretend to know who’s doing what with 100 percent certainty: the video for standout track “Dark Waters Rushing In” proves that Jeanty handles plenty of the percussive effects, while Momin does a lot more than just keep time. But here and throughout Map of Absences, Jeanty’s self-proclaimed affinity for abstraction and mysticism melds beautifully with Momin’s lithe, propulsive rhythmic constructions.” Read More…

PopMatters (Spyros Stasis, March 11, 2019) [for Turning Jewels Into Water]


“Map of Absences is an ambitious work and one that reveals the grand vision of Turning Jewels Into Water. Still, the duo is capable of also binding these impenetrable structures with slightly lighter motifs. The push towards rave-like motifs is very nicely adapted to that effect, while at other times a post-club rendition prevails. It is a nice cherry on top for an already impressive work.” Read More…

Pittsburgh Current (Feature article/Mike Shanley, March 5, 2019) [for Turning Jewels Into Water]

The release of their new album Map of Absences coincides with the appearance in Pittsburgh [at the Warhol Museum.] On the album, Jeanty, whose past collaborations include the late Geri Allen, and Momin might rely on electronics to create their music but they infuse it with the real-time reactions they honed as improvisers. Read More…

AfroPunk (Piotr Orlov, Jan 28, 2019)

Dark waters rushing in” is the sound of all these past-times and influences, as manifested through spare electronics. Dub-heavy with the bass settings stuck on “overwhelming,” TJIW’s track is also streaming with rhythmic ideas, mirroring a wide variety of local, next-generation beats-makers all over the world: Chicago footwork, Durban’s Gqom, Lisbon and Luanda’s post-Kuduro and -Kizomba fusions, and BK’s own flex productions — all find a space in the duo’s hard-drive, with Jeanty’s scratches and Momin’s drones adding layers to the organized chaos.” Read More…

IndieRocks  (Andres Angeles, Aug 30, 2018)

[translated] “Ghostly voices, dislocated beats and a digital amalgam flow within their songs along with mutant dubs, polyrhythmic percussions and interferences produced by synthesizers and futuristic turntables.”

“Voces fantasmales, beats dislocados y una amalgama digital fluyen dentro de sus canciones junto con dubs mutantes, percusiones polirítmicas e interferencias producidos por sintetizadores y tornamesas futuristas.” Read More…

Noisey|Vice (Interview/Luis Cleriga, Aug 21, 2018)
[translated] “Together, Turning Jewels Into Water create a microcosm that gives a breath of freshness to the rhythms that permeate current electronics and the post-digital universe.”

“Juntos, como Turning Jewels Into Water, crean un microcosmos que le da una bocanada de frescura a los ritmos negros que permean la electrónica actual y el universo post-digital.” Read More…

Ultramarinos (Aug 22, 2018)

[translated] “The project of Ravish and Val has penance in its name: Turning Jewels Into Water, transforming jazz into electronic music, turning dance into ritual and yes, turning realities into a single jewel, since talking about them also implies talking about the migration; of two people outside their country turning their talent into something as essential as water.”

“El proyecto de Ravish y Val lleva en el nombre la penitencia: transformar las joyas en agua, transformar el jazz en música electrónica, convertir el baile en ritual y sí, convertir las realidades en una sola joya, pues hablar de ellos también implica hablar de la migración; de dos personas fuera de su país convirtiendo su talento en algo tan esencial como el agua.” Read More…

Vans|MX  (Yannick SM, Aug 13, 2018)

[translated] “The elements that at times sink us into a spiritual terrain also suggest nuances in the background, but above all, they are the clear example of how different artistic discourses can be perfectly congenial to accommodate new creative possibilities.”

“Los elementos que por momentos nos hunden un terreno espiritual, también sugieren matices ambientales de fondo, pero sobre todo, son el claro ejemplo de cómo discursos artísticos diferentes pueden congeniar perfectamente para dar cabida a nuevas posibilidades creativas.”  Read More…

Deposito Sonoro  (DS Staff, July 16  2018)

[translated] “Thus, Turning Jewels Into Water is a new beginning with futuristic roots that give rise to mutant dubs, sine waves, polyrhythmic percussions and static interferences of an aerial console, through haunted turntables and post-apocalyptic synthesizers fused in the legacy of jazz, the illbient and the Afroelectronics.”

“Así, Turning JewelsInto Water es un nuevo inicio con raíces futuristas que dan lugar a dubs mutantes, ondas senoidales, percusiones polirrítmicas e interferencias estáticas de una consola áerea, mediante tornamesas embrujadas y sintetizadores post-apocalípticos fundidos en la herencia del jazz, el illbient y laafroelectrónica” Read More…

TheAnswerIsInTheBeat 
Percussionist Ravish Momin and Haitian turntablist Val Jeanty (aka Val-Inc) present a brief but potent EP of broken rhythms and lost afterlife transmissions. With eerie voices asking existentialist questions and diced up on a turntable, and heavy, unsteady beats booming on top, this sounds like the ’90s WordSound illbient scene updated for the era of footwork, Principe Discos, and Nyege Nyege Tapes. Not coincidentally, two producers from the latter label remixed the title track, although one of the mixes is digital-only. Slikback’s remix reminds me of Addison Groove’s juke/dubstep crossover tracks from nearly a decade ago. “Lights Below the Water” houses fractured earth rhythms, and “Vishwas” is an absolutely heavy bass killer, shaking right down to the foundation and responding with snapping snares and dubbed-up b-boy chants. Then it all builds up to a near panic attack before the very end. Read More…

 

BBC Leigh Patterson (for Val-Inc)
“From her Brooklyn loft, Haitian musician Val-INC. (Val Jeanty) mixes traditional drumbeats with mechanical gears, creating a funky fusion that she calls “voodoo electronica.” The music is her way of connecting with her roots and her ancestors, Jeanty says. Drawing from the voodoo religion, Val recreates the rhythm and pulse of Haiti through ancient beats. ”   Read More… 
 
Columbia Times  Vincent Harris (for Ravish Momin)
“Watching Ravish Momin play is a bewildering experience. Drums are supposed to be a non-melodic instrument, yet as he sits alone onstage playing his kit, you can hear eerie, spectral tunes emanating from somewhere. There are vocal samples and looped beats flying through the air, too, but by now the average music fan knows what a musician can do with effects and pedals to create those elements. This is something different. It’s a percussionist creating his own musical world, triggering electronic effects in a way that works them into his relentlessly propulsive playing. “  Read More…